mudgirl

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mudgirl last won the day on January 19

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About mudgirl

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  1. Well, if you are seriously planning to move here within the next year, I strongly suggest that you sign up for some beginning Spanish courses now where you live, or online, or using language learning tapes, rather than to start trying to learn when you get here. You will find your experience much fuller if you actually can understand at least some of what is being said around you. Many people who come to Mexico on vacation assume that most of the local Mexicans speak English, simply because the ones who work in the businesses which cater to tourists do. I can assure you that the majority of Mexicans, even in a tourist town, do not speak English, anymore than the average American is bilingual.
  2. You need either a temporary residency with permission to work, or you need permanent residency, which doesn't require any special permission to work. Working in Mexico, at ANY job, unless you are working online for an out-of-country business, is illegal. It's great that you have your hearts set on moving to Sayulita, just make sure you inform yourselves of the laws and requirements. And if you are planning on moving to a foreign country, it would be respectful to do more than be "willing to try and learn" the language.
  3. I assume (perhaps falsely) that you come to Mexico on a tourist visa? You can buy a car here on a tourist visa, but you will not be able to register it. One of those Mex. catch-22s.
  4. I have a home I built here and consider house insurance a waste of $. My house is solid concrete construction, no palapas to catch fire or blow away in a hurricane, and since the cost of construction repairs are relatively low here, I can't see the point in forking out insurance $ every year, then filling out endless paperwork, fighting with the insurance company, etc. if I ever had a claim. Getting some cracks repaired after an earthquake would likely cost less than the deductible.
  5. The shower water probably did not smell like sewage- that smell was coming from the drain in the shower. Many bathrooms here smell like that here because they are not properly plumbed- no trap in the shower drain, and/or plumbing the shower drain directly into the toilet outlet pipe. I think if people could see how dishes are washed in many restaurants here, they would not eat there. A little tub of tepid soapy water with bits of food floating around in it, in which all of the dishes are washed, a little swish under the running tap. No commercial dishwashers, no boiling hot water, no bleach dip. So of course infections get passed around.
  6. The banks have different closing hours, but I think most close by 4-5. The bank doesn't need to be open for you to use the ATM- the ATM booths are always open, and yes, it is better to use one attached to a bank, as if it eats your card, funds are stolen, or something, at least you can talk to someone about it, even if you have to go back the next day if they are closed. Citibank or Intercam will change US dollars, Bancomer for sure doesn't, not sure about others.
  7. Very nice post by the OP. Too bad so many people found it necessary to counter what she said about being able to successfully plan their own wedding and plug the various Sayulita wedding planners, who are by all reports excellent at what they do, but that was not the topic. So somewhat off-topic, but pertinent: there are many huge wedding parties in Sayulita. The guests are booked at various rental properties around town. There have been many instances of these properties, full of people in party mode, keeping the neighbors (local Mexicans, local foreigners, and other tourists) awake until 4 or 5 in the morning with super loud music, drunken screaming and yelling, etc. Please be aware that just because you are in extreme party mode, not everyone is. In fact, the very people who serve you in the restaurants, plan and work for the weddings, run the shops where you will purchase your stuff, etc. need to sleep at night so they can get up and do their jobs in the morning. Please try to be respectful.
  8. And you know you have to catch the bus from the other side of the highway from the airport, crossing over the overhead walkway, right? The buses to Sayulita don't come into the airport. Make sure it says Sayulita in the front window, some only go as far as Bucerias or Punta de Mita.
  9. Oh, and a PS, Ed, while attire is casual here, and you won't get turned away wearing shorts and a tank top, if you want to go to one of the nicer restaurants in town for dinner, people do tend to dress for that, rather than show up looking like they just walked off the beach.
  10. ChicoBeach- As a Canadian who has lived here for 15 years, I can't believe you said that! Maybe there are many progressive Guadalajarans who would not be offended, but I can guarantee you that the locals along the coast here do not accept public nudity.
  11. If you by any chance bank at Scotiabank, there is a Scotiabank at the Mega in Bucerias (if you are coming from the airport by taxi, ask him to stop there before continuing on to Sayulita). You can use your Canadian Scotiabank card at the ATM there, no problem. Make sure you have whatever minimum balance you need in your account not to incur any ATM fees. And no, it doesn't first get converted to US dollars. I haven't had to withdraw from my Canadian account for quite awhile, so I can't tell you what exchange rate is current.
  12. The evenings can be quite cool in January/Feb. Right now I'm wearing jeans and long sleeves and I put my wool socks on last night. My last guest went to town at night in shorts and a T shirt and told me the next morning she was freezing. And she was from Mexico City, where it gets quite cold. I am sleeping with my down quilt. Just saying, you might need more than summer clothes.
  13. Actually I find June and October to be the hottest months here- before it starts raining and after it stops, when there is just relentless heat and high humidity. Once the rainy season starts, it cools things down considerably. I live here year round, in the countryside (so not a bunch of concrete around to hold the heat), have a dense garden, some breeze some of the time, I don't have any AC (personally, I hate sleeping in an air conditioned room), just fans, and I do everything I would normally do, albeit a little slower and with several breaks to stand in a cool shower. For sleeping, I find a standing fan directed on me works better than a ceiling fan. I know some people find the summer here unbearable, but I'd much rather be too hot than too cold. And Ajijic is way too cold for me in the winter! Didn't move to Mexico to need a heater.
  14. Jo Ann, It's nice that you are excited about wanting to teach English at schools here, but you need to do your research on Mexican immigration and work visas. You can't just come down on a tourist visa and work. You would have to get a job offer, then apply with that at a consulate up north. The place to get all the pertinent info is not on a public forum.
  15. You could take it up to the Pemex and use the air hose.